Tuesday, 1 October 2013

Tank Corps Cap Badge with Colours of Corps

WW1 Tank Corps Cap Badge
WW1 Tank Corps Cap Badge
 This is a nice First World war officers bronze Tank Corps cap badge. The officer who had this badge drilled two holes in it and on the reverse stitched cloth with the Tank Corps colours.

The colours typified the struggle of the Corps - 'From mud, through blood to the green fields beyond'. This most apt interpretation of the colours was suggested by Colonel Fuller. The flag is flown with the green uppermost The story goes that just before the battle of Cumbrai in 1917, General Elles wanting a distinguishing mark for his tank, went into a shop to buy material for a flag. Supplies were short but he came out with a length of green, red and brown silk. He stitched this together and flew it from his tank "Hilda" which he led the corps into battle.


Reverse with Tank Corps Colours

Sunday, 9 June 2013

The South Staffordshire Plastic Economy Cap Badge

The South Staffordshire Plastic Economy Cap Badge
The South Staffordshire Plastic Economy Cap Badge
 Above is The South Staffordshire Regiment War Time plastic Cap Badge. These badges were introduced during the Second World War when metals became more strategic materials. You can see from the picture below that there should be two blades, one of which has broken off. The South Staffordshire Regiment were involved in glider operations during D-Day. Also operated as part of operation Market Garden in Arhnem.
Reverse, one of the blades is missing



Friday, 11 January 2013

WW1 Silver War Badge

WW1 Silver War Badge
WW1 Silver War Badge
 The above is the WW1 sliver war badge. This badge was issued to UK service personnel who had been honorably discharged due to wounds or sickness. The badge was worn on the right breast whilst wearing civilian clothing. It became common practice for women to hand out a white feather to men not wearing a uniform  So this badge was introduced to prevent this from happening. Each badge is numbered on the reverese as can be seen on the picture below.
Reverse
After a small bit of research online. I used ancestry.co.uk, I came up with his silver war badge record shown below and from that found out his name and number and used that to find his Medal index card. Also shown below.

Recipient of above silver war badge
 He's name was Spr James Childs and was in the Royal Engineers. He was wounded 26 June 1918 he was entitled to the Victory medal and British war medal. His medal index card shows his entitlement to the Silver War Badge.
James Childs Medal index card

Sunday, 30 September 2012

Junior Parachute Company Wing

Junior Parachute Company Wing
Junior Parachute Company Wing
 The above is the Junior Parachute Company Wing. This is an early one. I got this wing from a friend who was in the Para's. He tells me they used to chase the Junior Para's and cut there wings up. This means that this badge is pretty rare nowadays

Junior Parachute Company Wing reverse
Junior Parachute Company Wing
The Junior Parachute Company was part of the Parachute Regiment and consisted of boys aged between 15 and 17. All hoping to become Para's by the age of 18. The company no longer exists. It was formed in 1961 and disbanded in 1993.

Saturday, 11 August 2012

British 8th Army corps

British 8th Army corps
The 8th Army Corps charging knight was adopted in February, 1943 as it was composed of two armoured divisions. It landed in Normandy and subsequently took part in the operations and reached the river Elbe in spring of 1945. The above is an original printed cloth badge.

Monday, 25 June 2012

15th Middlesex (London Scottish) Rifle Volunteers Belt buckle


15th Middlesex (London Scottish) Rifle Volunteers Belt buckle
Picked this up the other day. It is the 15th Middlesex Rifle Volunteers, also know as the London Scottish, leather belt and Buckle. It would date around 1859 - 1880. They were founded in 1859 as part of a Volunteer force The Highland Society of London and The Caledonian Society of London.

The London Scottish have changed titles and lineage over the years, today they are A (London Scottish) Company of The London Regiment.

The showing leather belt
 It has to be quite rare. The leather is still supple but I probably will put some cream on it.
Reverse of buckle
Listed here for sell
Size adjustment buckle

Friday, 22 June 2012

WW2 German Kriegsmarine u-boat combat clasp in bronze


WW2 German Kriegsmarine u-boat clasp in bronze
WW2 German Kriegsmarine u-boat clasp in bronze
 
The above is a U-Boat Combat Clasp. This one is the bronze class. Instituted on 15 May 1944, it was awarded for acts behind the scenes or an event beyond the call of duty. To commemorate and recognize greater courage performed by the U-boat service. Ninety percent of U-boat crews were lost at sea and they were all volunteers. It brings to mind the bravery and valour that this decoration was instituted to commemorate.





Reverse
The designer of the badge was Peekhaus and this is found on the reverse of the badge along with the makers logo. Maker marked AUSF SCHWERIN BERLIN — ENTWURF PEEKHAUS as can be seen in the above photo. Most badges have a fluted pin as can be seen.
Side detail

Hinge fitment

Hinge fitment

Catch